Please note Worcestershire Camera Club special interest groups (Digital Photography, Contemporary, Audio Visual, and Photography Development) are currently running online via Zoom.  Members signed up for notifications from the groups will receive emails with details of the meetings. 


It’s simply amazing how each month, the Contemporary Group produces such a wide range of very different and enjoyable photography.  Here’s a brief résumé of our May meeting.

What are narratives?  This was the question posed by Stewart Bourne to begin our session.  Stewart illustrated this question with his insightful monochrome studies. The strength of work with ‘direct narrative’ was continued through a diverse set of imagery.  Beginning with those near home, Peter Young’s facets of ‘lockdown’ in Worcester moved from observational street scenes to imaginative abstract miniature landscapes.   Lucy Allum, with a fresh eye, presented a personal view of Diglis, whilst Nigel Reader explored reflections and the contents of shop windows in Droitwich. 

Moving further afield, in photo-reportage style, Dr. Charles Ashton illustrated London as it awakens from the restrictions of ‘lockdown’, whilst in contrast, adopting a documentary approach, Judy Knights looked at Strensham Lock.  Travelling further afield, Paul Mann showed scenes of the quant and quirky ‘bamboo railway’ in Cambodia. 

Through her passionate visual narrative, Angie Hill illustrated how social divisions in society continue to be represented, particularly in the countryside where landowners use barbed-wire fences, barriers and signage to block public rights of way.  Forlorn, closed and derelict filling-stations provided the theme for Clive Haynes.  Clive’s narrative gave a vision of the shape of things to come, as electric cars proliferate and we abandon fossil fuels. 

An oblique approach to narrative was adopted by Bob Oakley through details of graffiti in Antwerp whilst both Tessa Mills and Alex Isaacs posed questions within their narrative structures. Tessa used shadows and reflections in the still waters of a local canal to help redefine herself.  Alex’s images observed the conscious and unconscious relationships between people and works of art. 

Maddy Pennock introduced a conceptual fine-art viewpoint to reveal her personal response to the pandemic and wider global concerns.  Carefully selecting subjects from the natural world Maddy powerfully blends them with her water-colour paintings.  Karen Dewson adopted an entirely different approach to present another obliquely referenced narrative to illustrate how ‘lockdown’ increased her ‘screen-time’.  

All images and introductory 'statements' are in our May 'Viewpoint' e-book.  See link below.

Our two ‘Outside Sources’ provided additional stimulation.

The recently successful RPS Associateship panel by Paul Ashley reflected on the collapse and decay of the workshops and machines in the extensive slate workings at Blaenau Ffestiniog that were once so powerful.

Artist and photographerRichard Tuschman has been creating remarkable physical and digital constructions and his series, ‘My Childhood Reassembled’, represents a personal journey into the past. As he states in the title, the project reassembles and “creates a picture that expresses both the joy and pathos of childhood, as reflected in the fluctuating and ever-changing mirror of my memory.

Tuschman builds small dioramas that reflect the structural and sensory details of his childhood home in Ohio. He then works with actors to recreate scenes that have particular meaning to him.

Link: http://lenscratch.com/2021/04/richard-tuschman-2/

 

Here's the link to the May edition of 'Viewpoint' (or click on the image) which contains all members images and introductions from the session.

This link opens a fresh page where you’ll also see recent previous editions.  Previous copies of Viewpoint can be found on the Contemporary Group homepage.

Viewpoint may take several seconds to download to your device.

Extra.....
As the meeting began, several members talked about maps they had found interesting and useful.  Here are the links:

From Clive, Historic maps with present-day satellite overlays:
https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=16&lat=52.18820&lon=-2.21944&layers=168&b=1

From Peter, A local area map with details of footpaths
https://gis.worcestershire.gov.uk/website/countryside/

From Richard, Magic Map which also contains great detail
https://magic.defra.gov.uk/